Functionality of Triclosan

How Triclosan works

Microbes are so tiny that they are invisible to the human eye, and yet they can be found everywhere on animate and inanimate surfaces. Most of them are harmless and can even be of benefit, e.g. the natural bacterial skin flora protecting our skin, microorganisms used in food industry or for producing raw materials for consumer care and pharmaceutical products (e.g. enzymes, organic acids, vitamins etc.).

On the other side, some microbes are pathogenic and can induce severe diseases such as wound infections, skin infections, infections of the intestinal tract (diarrhoe), urinary tract infections, tuberculosis, colds and flues. Pathogens can be transferred between human beings via droplet infection, skin contact and from surface to skin but also via water and food. The risk for contamination is especially high at locations with large gatherings of people or where people are densely packed, e.g. on public transport, escalators, in schools, kindergardens, shopping centres, large events with big audiences and especially locations where impacted immune systems are common, e.g. hospitals or homes for the aged. Triclosan is an antimicrobial active substance for which various modes of effective action have been described.

Resources

Bacteria
Fungi
Viruses

Bacteria

In comparison to other antimicrobial active substances, Triclosan is an extremely efficient bacteriostatic active substance at low concentrations.

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Fungi

As an antimicrobial substance, Triclosan can help to prevent fungal skin infections.

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Viruses

Triclosan has been found to be effective against various pathogenic enveloped viruses.

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